July 23, 2014

YOUNG ONES, a dystopian film/futuristic western set in a near future where water has become incredibly scarce, resulting in the desertification of the planet, tells the story of a boy struggling to survive and protect his family. The film stars Michael Shannon as a father trying to protect his land and rejuvenate the soil, but his daughter’s boyfriend wants the land for himself and will do anything to get it. YOUNG ONES premiered at Sundance, and it looks like it will get a release in October 2014. Looks interesting, I’ll definitely be checking this out.

July 22, 2014

SUFFER THE CHILDREN by Craig DiLouieCityGirlScapes.com interviewed me about SUFFER THE CHILDREN for their blog.

It was a great discussion, which you can check out here.

July 21, 2014

Some enterprising person compiled all the death scenes in THE WALKING DEAD, now available for your viewing pleasure:

I’d have to say the winner is Rick offing ponytail guy at the prison.

July 18, 2014

SUFFER THE CHILDREN by Craig DiLouieRedCarpetCrash.com reviewed SUFFER THE CHILDREN and writes, “The story draws you in, very gradually and you don’t realize until it’s too late that you’re in hell … Will I sleep again? Yes, someday perhaps. Definitely not for the faint-hearted.”

Check it out here.

July 17, 2014

THE BIRD BOX by Josh MalermanTHE BIRD BOX by Josh Malerman tells the story of a mother who must get her two children to sanctuary down a river while blindfolded. Because there are creatures out there, and to see them is to become violently insane … Concurrently, the book tells the story of what happened in the house where she hid with other survivors.

This was an interesting read. Malerman, whom I had the pleasure of meeting at the World Horror Convention, writes with sparse, simple prose that had me turning pages. This apocalyptic story is compelling because you want to learn more about the creatures and, of course, what happens during the journey and to the survivors at the house.

Based on the Amazon reviews, readers are responding to the book in a big way, though they may find some oddities in the plot. For example, a string of murder-suicides leads to a rumor they saw something, but how could anybody know that? Suddenly, strangely, people everywhere are boarding up their houses and walking around with their eyes closed. There’s a hint at what people are actually seeing–and it’s cool and Lovecraftian–but again, how could anybody know that? You just have to go with it. The woman’s children, whom she strangely calls Boy and Girl, don’t seem to have personalities. The ending wraps things up but not quite with a bang.

Despite these reactions from this reader, I greatly enjoyed the story and read it in just a few nights. The story grabs you and is compelling, it’s original, and the prose tight. It’s an impressive debut novel from Malerman, and I’ll be reading his stuff in the future.
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